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CCIE Practical Studies: Configuring Route-Maps and Policy-based Routing

Chapter Description

Route maps are like duct tape for the network—they can be applied to numerous situations to address many issues. At times, they may not be the most "pretty solutions," but they will be very effective. Karl Solie and Leah Lynch show you how to configure and use route maps.

Lab 4: Configuring Policy-Based Routing—Part I

Practical Scenario

Route maps are also used for PBR. You can use PBR to force traffic to paths that are different from the ones in the normal forwarding/route table. You can use PBR to control traffic based on ToS, packet size and type, and source address, among others. This lab gives you practice in configuring complex PBR route maps using packet size and in controlling default routes.

Lab Exercise

Wizards of the Woods is the leading manufacturer of fantasy card games, fantasy role-playing games, and computer games. Wizards of the Woods has organized its divisions by geographic locations. To each division, there are two Frame Relay PVCs from the headquarters router, called the wow router. One PVC operates at T1 speeds; this runs between the wow and plains router. The other is a low-speed PVC, 64 kbps, between the wow and swamp router. The wow router also provides Internet service to the division. Wizards want to control and streamline traffic through the WAN and to the wow servers by using PBR. Your task is to configure an IP network and PBR using the following strict design guidelines:

  • Configure the Wizards of the Woods IP network as depicted in Figure 2-12. Use EIGRP as the routing protocol and 65002 as the autonomous system ID on all routers.

  • Configure the Frame Relay network as depicted in Figure 2-12.

  • Configure all IP addresses as depicted in Figure 2-12.

  • Use the "Lab Objectives" section for configuration specifics.

Lab Objectives

  • Configure EIGRP as the routing protocol, as depicted in Figure 2-12. Use 65002 as the autonomous system ID.

  • Configure EIGRP such that the routing protocol will prefer the higher-bandwidth link between the plains and wow routers over the swamp and wow routers for traffic that comes from the forest router. EIGRP should prefer this path when routing traffic for the forest, mountain, and island routers. (Hint: Set the bandwidth properly on the serial interfaces.)

  • The testing and functionality of this lab will be greatly enhanced if there is an available connection to the Internet. The wow router will be configured to advertise a default route for Internet traffic. If an Internet connection is not available, you may simulate it with a loopback address or another router.

  • Figure 12Figure 2-12 Wizards of the Woods

    • Configure PBR using the following guidelines:

      • IP traffic from the mountain and island routers with a small packet size, 0 to 1199 bytes, destined for the wow servers should use the high-speed link between the plains and the wow routers.

      • IP traffic from the mountain and island routers with a large packet size, 1200 to 1544 bytes, destined for the wow servers should use the low-speed link between the swamp and wow routers.

      • Internet traffic from the mountain router should use the high-speed link through the plains router.

      • Internet traffic from the island router should use the low-speed link through the swamp router.

      • Configure fast switching for PBR.

      • For the purposes of the lab, do not worry about the return route of the traffic. EIGRP will load share for return traffic.

    • (Optional) If you have access to the Internet, enhance the lab and your practice by making this model as close as you can to the real thing. Configure NAT on the wow router, such that all routers including the mountain and island routers can reach the Internet.

    Equipment Needed

    • Seven Cisco routers; three will be connected via V.35 back-to-back cable or a similar fashion to a single router serving as the Frame Relay switch.

    • Four LAN segments, provided via hubs or switches. Figure 2-12 shows the wow router with two LAN interfaces; one of these interfaces may be substituted with a loopback interface or another router to simulate the Internet, if a real Internet connection is not available.

    • You may want to use IP workstations or servers to simulate response for the wow servers.

    Physical Layout and Prestaging

    • Connect the hubs and serial cables to the routers as shown in Figure 2-12.

    • A Frame Relay switch with two PVCs is also required. Example 2-48 lists the Frame Relay configuration used in this lab.

    Example 2-48 Frame Relay Switch Configuration

    hostname frame_switch
    !
    frame-relay switching
    !
    interface Serial0
     no ip address
     encapsulation frame-relay
     no fair-queue
     clockrate 2000000
    frame-relay intf-type dce
     frame-relay route 102 interface Serial1 101
     frame-relay route 302 interface Serial4 206
    !
    interface Serial1
     no ip address
     encapsulation frame-relay
     clockrate 2000000
     frame-relay intf-type dce
     frame-relay route 101 interface Serial0 102
    !
    <<<text omitted>>>
    !
    interface Serial4
     no ip address
     encapsulation frame-relay
     clockrate 64000
     frame-relay intf-type dce
     frame-relay route 206 interface Serial0 302
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