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Using Static IP Addresses on Your Network

Article Description

Do you regularly access shares or servers on your network? If so, it is better to assign IP addresses to these devices instead of getting them automatically from DHCP. Eric Geier, author of Wi-Fi Hotspots: Setting Up Public Wireless Internet Access, helps you discover ways to convert from dynamic to static addresses.
Reserving DHCP Addresses

Reserving DHCP Addresses

As mentioned, in this approach you can selectivity reserve IP addresses for certain clients. The first step is to bring up your router's web-based configuration utility by typing in its IP address; for example, 192.168.0.1 and 192.168.1.1 are popular addresses for routers.

Once you log in with the default password or one you've created, find the spot where you can change the DHCP settings. Some routers have this in the General or Network tab, while some have a DHCP tab dedicated to it.

Now see if the router's DHCP server has a reservation feature. For example, you might see something similar to what's pictured in Figure 1. If it does have it, configure reservations for the desired clients.

You might find it works like the example D-Link router, in which you can select a computer or client by its name to automatically fill in its Name, MAC Address, and current IP. Then you can optionally change the IP to something more memorable and hit Add. When you're done, you should see the reservation on the list, in which you can modify or delete it.

Simply leave the default setting for the network adapter(s) in Windows configured to automatically receive an IP. The client(s) should receive the reserved IP instead of a random dynamic one when they poll the DHCP server.

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