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Defining the Virtual Business and its Benefits

Article Description

Virtual business (VB) and virtual business processes (VBP) are terms that are seeing increasingly more press. Before the media and sensational journalists take control of the terms sending them through the usual over-hype, heightened expectations versus reality, then practical implementation cycle, Martha Young and Michael Jude suggest we short circuit the cycle and jump right into the definitions, benefits, and practical implementation examples. Net out the business benefits, so to speak.

Where do I begin?

There is no right or wrong beginning point to virtualizing business processes. Start with some of the easier components and reap those benefits first. This would include processes such as payroll, human resources, benefits administration or accounting, all of which can be either managed and supported remotely, or outsourced. The point is to begin.

The benefits obtained through virtualization are not singular in nature. They provide on-going, repetitive benefits. In addition, by virtualizing one process at a time, the benefits are cumulative and greater than the sum of their parts. Finally, by approaching virtualization one component at a time, the success rate will be substantially higher due to the bounded parameters of a discrete, manageable project.

About the Authors

Martha Young has more than nineteen years of experience in the technology market and is a partner in Nova Amber, LLC, a consulting firm. Martha is the co-author of The Case for Virtual Business Processes, published by Cisco Press. She can be reached at info@novaamber.com.

Michael Jude, Ph.D. is a well-known industry analyst with more than twenty years of experience in telecommunications and management automation. Michael is the co-author of The Case for Virtual Business Processes, published by Cisco Press.