Home > Articles > Cisco Network Technology > General Networking > Applying the Principles of Network Design

Applying the Principles of Network Design

Chapter Description

The three basics of highly scalable networks (the routing table size, summarization, and addressing) are closely related. To illustrate these principles, this Cisco Press sample chapter begins with a network that is experiencing stability problems and "reforms" it to make it stable and scalable.

Review

1. What does hierarchy provide in a well-designed network?

2. What is the primary tool used to bound the area affected by network changes?

3. How can you determine which links can be removed from a fully-meshed core network to decrease the number of links?

4. What provides ways around failure points in the network?

5. What two things are most desirable in a routing protocol?

6. What can a routing protocol do to decrease it's burden to hosts that are not running routing on a network?

7. List the addressing problems that are caused by having multiple links to external networks.

8. Given the network shown in Figure 4-10, how many routes do you think a core router will have in its table if no summarization is applied?

9. How many routes do you think a core router will have in its table if all possible summarization is done?

10. Define the core, distribution, and access layers of the network shown in Figure 4-11.

11. Correct any problems in the topology that will affect the stability of the network pictured in Figure 4-11. Explain the changes you make and why.

12. Address the network shown in Figure 4-11 in a way that reduces the routes in the core to a minimum.

Figure 4-11 Review Exercise Network