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DSL and Cable Modem Networks

Contents

  1. Digital Subscriber Line
  2. Cable Access Technologies
  3. Summary
  4. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)
  5. Case Study

Chapter Description

Before committing to a DSL or cable-modem, learn exactly what these technologies consist of and what kind of service they can provide for you.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

  1. Which is better: DSL or cable modem?

    There is no clear choice between the two because each service offers its own advantages and disadvantages.

    The main disadvantages of cable modems, when compared to DSL service, is the shared bandwidth to the cable head-end; end-users and their neighbors share the same cable. The Internet access point tends to be the congestion point, as well as the Internet itself. Another disadvantage is the end-user cannot choose the Internet Service Provider (ISP). Cable TV lines do not have "common-carrier" status as do phone lines.

    DSL solutions provide the end-user with a dedicated line to the ISP; there is no bandwidth sharing with other users on the same access network. Like cable modem implementations, the Internet access point tends to be the congestion point, as well as the Internet itself.

  2. Does Cisco manufacture or sell xDSL solutions?

    Yes, Cisco provides DSL equipment for NSP and enterprise environments, as well as network management for a DSL platform. More information regarding Cisco's product and solution offering can be found at www.cisco.com/warp/public/44/solutions/network/dsl.shtml.

  3. Does Cisco manufacture or sell cable solutions?

    Yes, Cisco provides cable equipment for head-end and customer premise environments, as well as network management for a cable platform. More information regarding Cisco's product and solution offering can be found at www.cisco.com/warp/public/44/jump/cable.shtml.

  4. Can a television be connected to the cable modem line?

    Yes. In most cases this configuration will work as long as a splitter is used to "split" the television signal apart from the cable modem (data) signal. It is imperative to discuss this configuration with the CATV provider to ensure that no adverse effects to the TV or data signal are experienced by the end-user.

5. Case Study | Next Section Previous Section