larger cover

Add To My Wish List

Register your product to gain access to bonus material or receive a coupon.

Introduction to Networks v6 Course Booklet

Book

  • Your Price: $33.00
  • List Price: $36.67
  • Usually ships in 24 hours.
  • About
  • Description
  • Sample Content
  • Updates

Features

  • A low-cost, text-only booklet of the course narrative for easy offline studying
  • Easy to read, highlight, and review on the go, wherever the Internet is not available.
  • Extracted directly from the online course, with headings that have exact page correlations to the online course
  • An icon system directs the reader to the online course to take full advantage of the images, labs, Packet Tracer activities, and dynamic activities

  • Copyright 2017
  • Dimensions: 8-1/2" x 10-7/8"
  • Pages: 288
  • Edition: 1st
  • Book
  • ISBN-10: 1-58713-359-8
  • ISBN-13: 978-1-58713-359-6

Introduction to Networks v6 Course Booklet

Your Cisco Networking Academy® Course Booklet is designed as a study resource you can easily read, highlight, and review on the go, wherever the Internet is not available or practical:

·         The text is extracted directly, word-for-word, from the online course so you can highlight important points and take notes in the “Your Chapter Notes” section.

·         Headings with the exact page correlations provide a quick reference to the online course for your classroom discussions and exam preparation.

·         An icon system directs you to the online curriculum to take full advantage of the images embedded within the Networking Academy online course interface and reminds you to do the labs, interactive activities, packet tracer activities, watch videos, and take the chapter quizzes.

The Course Booklet is a basic, economical paper-based resource to help you succeed with the Cisco Networking Academy online course.

Related titles:

Introduction to Networks v6 Labs & Study Guide

Book: 978-1-58713-361-9

Introduction to Networks v6 Companion Guide

Book: 978-1-58713-360-2

eBook: 978-0-13-465563-5

CCNA Routing and Switching Portable Command Guide, Fourth Edition

Book: 978-1-58720-588-0

eBook: 978-0-13-446617-0

Table of Contents

Chapter 0 Course Introduction 1

0.0 Welcome to Introduction to Networks 1

    0.0.1 Message to the Student 1

        0.0.1.1 Welcome 1

        0.0.1.2 A Global Community 1

        0.0.1.3 More Than Just Information 1

        0.0.1.4 How We Teach 2

        0.0.1.5 Practice Leads to Mastery 2

        0.0.1.6 Mind Wide Open 2

        0.0.1.7 Engineering Journals 2

        0.0.1.8 Explore the World of Networking 2

        0.0.1.9 Create Your Own Worlds 3

        0.0.1.10 How Packet Tracer Helps Master Concepts 3

        0.0.1.11 Course Overview 3

Chapter 1 Explore the Network 5

1.0 Introduction 5

        1.0.1.1 Exploring the Network 5

        1.0.1.2 Class Activity - Draw Your Concept of the Internet 5

1.1 Globally Connected 6

    1.1.1 Networking Today 6

        1.1.1.1 Networks in Our Daily Lives 6

        1.1.1.2 Technology Then and Now 6

        1.1.1.3 No Boundaries 6

        1.1.1.4 Networks Support the Way We Learn 7

        1.1.1.5 Networks Support the Way We Communicate 7

        1.1.1.6 Networks Support the Way We Work 8

        1.1.1.7 Networks Support the Way We Play 8

        1.1.1.8 Lab - Researching Network Collaboration Tools 8

    1.1.2 Providing Resources in a Network 9

        1.1.2.1 Networks of Many Sizes 9

        1.1.2.2 Clients and Servers 9

        1.1.2.3 Peer-to-Peer 9

1.2 LANs, WANs, and the Internet 10

    1.2.1 Network Components 10

        1.2.1.1 Overview of Network Components 10

        1.2.1.2 End Devices 10

        1.2.1.3 Intermediary Network Devices 10

        1.2.1.4 Network Media 11

        1.2.1.5 Network Representations 11

        1.2.1.6 Topology Diagrams 11

        1.2.1.7 Activity - Network Component Representations and Functions 12

    1.2.2 LANs and WANs 12

        1.2.2.1 Types of Networks 12

        1.2.2.2 Local Area Networks 12

        1.2.2.3 Wide Area Networks 13

    1.2.3 The Internet, Intranets, and Extranets 13

        1.2.3.1 The Internet 13

        1.2.3.2 Intranets and Extranets 13

    1.2.4 Internet Connections 14

        1.2.4.1 Internet Access Technologies 14

        1.2.4.2 Home and Small Office Internet Connections 14

        1.2.4.3 Businesses Internet Connections 15

        1.2.4.4 Packet Tracer - Help and Navigation Tips 15

        1.2.4.5 Packet Tracer - Network Representation 15

1.3 The Network as a Platform 16

    1.3.1 Converged Networks 16

        1.3.1.1 Traditional Separate Networks 16

        1.3.1.2 The Converging Network 16

        1.3.1.3 Lab — Researching Converged Network Services 16

    1.3.2 Reliable Network 16

        1.3.2.1 Network Architecture 16

        1.3.2.2 Fault Tolerance 17

        1.3.2.3 Scalability 17

        1.3.2.4 Quality of Service 17

        1.3.2.5 Security 18

        1.3.2.6 Activity - Reliable Networks 18

1.4 The Changing Network Environment 18

    1.4.1 Network Trends 18

        1.4.1.1 New Trends 18

        1.4.1.2 Bring Your Own Device 19

        1.4.1.3 Online Collaboration 19

        1.4.1.4 Video Communication 19

        1.4.1.5 Cloud Computing 20

    1.4.2 Networking Technologies for the Home 20

        1.4.2.1 Technology Trends in the Home 20

        1.4.2.2 Powerline Networking 20

        1.4.2.3 Wireless Broadband 21

    1.4.3 Network Security 21

        1.4.3.1 Security Threats 21

        1.4.3.2 Security Solutions 22

        1.4.3.3 Activity - Network Security Terminology 23

    1.4.4 Network Architecture 23

        1.4.4.1 Cisco Network Architecture 23

        1.4.4.2 CCNA 24

        1.4.4.3 Lab - Researching IT and Networking Job Opportunities 24

1.5 Summary 24

    1.5.1 Conclusion 24

        1.5.1.1 Class Activity — Draw Your Concept of the Internet Now 24

        1.5.1.2 Warriors of the Net 25

        1.5.1.3 Exploring the Network 25

Chapter 2 Configure a Network Operating System 27

2.0 Introduction 27

        2.0.1.1 Configure a Network Operating System 27

        2.0.1.2 Class Activity - It Is Just an Operating System 27

2.1 IOS Bootcamp 28

    2.1.1 Cisco IOS 28

        2.1.1.1 Operating Systems 28

        2.1.1.2 Purpose of OS 28

    2.1.2 Cisco IOS Access 29

        2.1.2.1 Access Methods 29

        2.1.2.2 Terminal Emulation Programs 29

        2.1.2.3 Activity - Accessing Devices 30

    2.1.3 Navigate the IOS 30

        2.1.3.1 Cisco IOS Modes of Operation 30

        2.1.3.2 Primary Command Modes 30

        2.1.3.3 Configuration Command Modes 30

        2.1.3.4 Navigate Between IOS Modes 31

    2.1.4 The Command Structure 32

        2.1.4.1 Basic IOS Command Structure 32

        2.1.4.2 IOS Command Syntax 32

        2.1.4.3 IOS Help Features 32

        2.1.4.4 Hotkeys and Shortcuts 33

        2.1.4.5 Video Demonstration — Hotkeys and Shortcuts 33

        2.1.4.6 Packet Tracer - Navigating the IOS 33

        2.1.4.7 Lab - Establishing a Console Session with Tera Term 33

2.2 Basic Device Configuration 34

    2.2.1 Hostnames 34

        2.2.1.1 Device Names 34

        2.2.1.2 Configure Hostnames 34

    2.2.2 Limit Access to Device Configurations 35

        2.2.2.1 Secure Device Access 35

        2.2.2.2 Configure Passwords 35

        2.2.2.3 Encrypt Passwords 35

        2.2.2.4 Banner Messages 36

        2.2.2.5 Syntax Checker - Limiting Access to a Switch 36

    2.2.3 Save Configurations 36

        2.2.3.1 Save the Running Configuration File 36

        2.2.3.2 Alter the Running Configuration 37

        2.2.3.3 Capture Configuration to a Text File 37

        2.2.3.4 Packet Tracer - Configuring Initial Switch Settings 38

2.3 Address Schemes 38

    2.3.1 Ports and Addresses 38

        2.3.1.1 IP Addresses 38

        2.3.1.2 Interfaces and Ports 39

    2.3.2 Configure IP Addressing 39

        2.3.2.1 Manual IP Address Configuration for End Devices 39

        2.3.2.2 Automatic IP Address Configuration for End Devices 40

        2.3.2.3 Switch Virtual Interface Configuration 40

        2.3.2.4 Syntax Checker - Configuring a Switch Virtual Interface 40

        2.3.2.5 Packet Tracer - Implementing Basic Connectivity 41

    2.3.3 Verifying Connectivity 41

        2.3.3.1 Interface Addressing Verification 41

        2.3.3.2 End-to-End Connectivity Test 41

        2.3.3.3 Lab - Building a Simple Network 41

        2.3.3.4 Lab - Configuring a Switch Management Address 41

2.4 Summary 42

    2.4.1 Conclusion 42

        2.4.1.1 Class Activity - Tutor Me 42

        2.4.1.2 Packet Tracer - Skills Integration Challenge 42

        2.4.1.3 Configure a Network Operating System 42

Chapter 3 Network Protocols and Communications 45

3.0 Introduction 45

        3.0.1.1 Network Protocols and Communications 45

        3.0.1.2 Class Activity - Designing a Communications System 45

3.1 Rules of Communication 46

    3.1.1 The Rules 46

        3.1.1.1 Communication Fundamentals 46

        3.1.1.2 Rule Establishment 46

        3.1.1.3 Message Encoding 47

        3.1.1.4 Message Formatting and Encapsulation 47

        3.1.1.5 Message Size 48

        3.1.1.6 Message Timing 48

        3.1.1.7 Message Delivery Options 49

3.2 Network Protocols and Standards 49

    3.2.1 Protocols 49

        3.2.1.1 Rules that Govern Communications 49

        3.2.1.2 Network Protocols 50

        3.2.1.3 Protocol Interaction 50

    3.2.2 Protocol Suites 51

        3.2.2.1 Protocol Suites and Industry Standards 51

        3.2.2.2 Development of TCP/IP 51

        3.2.2.3 TCP/IP Protocol Suite 51

        3.2.2.4 TCP/IP Communication Process 52

        3.2.2.5 Activity - Mapping the Protocols of the TCP/IP Suite 52

    3.2.3 Standard Organizations 52

        3.2.3.1 Open Standards 52

        3.2.3.2 Internet Standards 53

        3.2.3.3 Electronics and Communications Standard Organizations 53

        3.2.3.4 Lab - Researching Networking Standards 54

    3.2.4 Reference Models 54

        3.2.4.1 The Benefits of Using a Layered Model 54

        3.2.4.2 The OSI Reference Model 55

        3.2.4.3 The TCP/IP Protocol Model 55

        3.2.4.4 OSI Model and TCP/IP Model Comparison 55

        3.2.4.5 Activity - Identify Layers and Functions 56

        3.2.4.6 Packet Tracer - Investigating the TCP/IP and OSI Models in Action 56

3.3 Data Transfer in the Network 56

    3.3.1 Data Encapsulation 56

        3.3.1.1 Message Segmentation 56

        3.3.1.2 Protocol Data Units 57

        3.3.1.3 Encapsulation Example 57

        3.3.1.4 De-encapsulation 57

        3.3.1.5 Activity - Identify the PDU Layer 57

    3.3.2 Data Access 57

        3.3.2.1 Network Addresses 57

        3.3.2.2 Data Link Addresses 58

        3.3.2.3 Devices on the Same Network 58

        3.3.2.4 Devices on a Remote Network 59

3.4 Summary 60

    3.4.1 Conclusion 60

        3.4.1.1 Lab - Installing Wireshark 60

        3.4.1.2 Lab - Using Wireshark to View Network Traffic 60

        3.4.1.3 Class Activity - Guaranteed to Work! 61

        3.4.1.4 Network Protocols and Communications 61

Chapter 4 Network Access 63

4.0 Introduction 63

        4.0.1.1 Network Access 63

        4.0.1.2 Class Activity — Managing the Medium 63

4.1 Physical Layer Protocols 63

    4.1.1 Physical Layer Connection 63

        4.1.1.1 Types of Connections 63

        4.1.1.2 Network Interface Cards 64

    4.1.2 Purpose of the Physical Layer 65

        4.1.2.1 The Physical Layer 65

        4.1.2.2 Physical Layer Media 65

        4.1.2.3 Physical Layer Standards 65

        4.1.2.4 Lab - Identifying Network Devices and Cabling 66

    4.1.3 Physical Layer Characteristics 66

        4.1.3.1 Functions 66

        4.1.3.2 Bandwidth 67

        4.1.3.3 Throughput 68

        4.1.3.4 Types of Physical Media 68

        4.1.3.5 Activity - Physical Layer Terminology 68

4.2 Network Media 69

    4.2.1 Copper Cabling 69

        4.2.1.1 Characteristics of Copper Cabling 69

        4.2.1.2 Copper Media 69

        4.2.1.3 Unshielded Twisted-Pair Cable 70

        4.2.1.4 Shielded Twisted-Pair Cable 70

        4.2.1.5 Coaxial Cable 70

        4.2.1.6 Copper Media Safety 71

        4.2.1.7 Activity - Copper Media Characteristics 71

    4.2.2 UTP Cabling 71

        4.2.2.1 Properties of UTP Cabling 71

        4.2.2.2 UTP Cabling Standards 72

        4.2.2.3 UTP Connectors 72

        4.2.2.4 Types of UTP Cable 73

        4.2.2.5 Testing UTP Cables 73

        4.2.2.6 Cable Pinouts 74

        4.2.2.7 Lab - Building an Ethernet Crossover Cable 74

    4.2.3 Fiber-Optic Cabling 74

        4.2.3.1 Properties of Fiber-Optic Cabling 74

        4.2.3.2 Fiber Media Cable Design 74

        4.2.3.3 Types of Fiber Media 75

        4.2.3.4 Fiber-Optic Connectors 75

        4.2.3.5 Testing Fiber Cables 76

        4.2.3.6 Fiber versus Copper 76

        4.2.3.7 Activity - Fiber Optics Terminology 76

    4.2.4 Wireless Media 76

        4.2.4.1 Properties of Wireless Media 76

        4.2.4.2 Types of Wireless Media 77

        4.2.4.3 Wireless LAN 78

        4.2.4.4 Packet Tracer — Connecting a Wired and Wireless LAN 78

        4.2.4.5 Lab - Viewing Wired and Wireless NIC Information 78

4.3 Data Link Layer Protocols 78

    4.3.1 Purpose of the Data Link Layer 78

        4.3.1.1 The Data Link Layer 78

        4.3.1.2 Data Link Sublayers 79

        4.3.1.3 Media Access Control 79

        4.3.1.4 Providing Access to Media 80

        4.3.1.5 Data Link Layer Standards 80

4.4 Media Access Control 81

    4.4.1 Topologies 81

        4.4.1.1 Controlling Access to the Media 81

        4.4.1.2 Physical and Logical Topologies 81

    4.4.2 WAN Topologies 82

        4.4.2.1 Common Physical WAN Topologies 82

        4.4.2.2 Physical Point-to-Point Topology 82

        4.4.2.3 Logical Point-to-Point Topology 82

    4.4.3 LAN Topologies 83

        4.4.3.1 Physical LAN Topologies 83

        4.4.3.2 Half and Full Duplex 83

        4.4.3.3 Media Access Control Methods 84

        4.4.3.4 Contention-Based Access — CSMA/CD 84

        4.4.3.5 Contention-Based Access — CSMA/CA 85

    4.4.4 Data Link Frame 85

        4.4.4.1 The Frame 85

        4.4.4.2 Frame Fields 85

        4.4.4.3 Activity — Generic Frame Fields 86

        4.4.4.4 Layer 2 Address 86

        4.4.4.5 LAN and WAN Frames 87

4.5 Summary 88

    4.5.1 Conclusion 88

        4.5.1.1 Class Activity — Linked In! 88

        4.5.1.2 Network Access 88

Chapter 5 Ethernet 91

5.0 Introduction 91

        5.0.1.1 Ethernet 91

        5.0.1.2 Class Activity - Join My Social Circle! 91

5.1 Ethernet Protocol 92

    5.1.1 Ethernet Frame 92

        5.1.1.1 Ethernet Encapsulation 92

        5.1.1.2 MAC Sublayer 93

        5.1.1.3 Ethernet Evolution 93

        5.1.1.4 Ethernet Frame Fields 94

        5.1.1.5 Activity - MAC and LLC Sublayers 94

        5.1.1.6 Activity - Ethernet Frame Fields 94

        5.1.1.7 Lab - Using Wireshark to Examine Ethernet Frames 94

    5.1.2 Ethernet MAC Addresses 94

        5.1.2.1 MAC Address and Hexadecimal 94

        5.1.2.2 MAC Address: Ethernet Identity 95

        5.1.2.3 Frame Processing 95

        5.1.2.4 MAC Address Representations 96

        5.1.2.5 Unicast MAC Address 96

        5.1.2.6 Broadcast MAC Address 97

        5.1.2.7 Multicast MAC Address 97

        5.1.2.8 Lab - Viewing Network Device MAC Addresses 97

5.2 LAN Switches 98

    5.2.1 The MAC Address Table 98

        5.2.1.1 Switch Fundamentals 98

        5.2.1.2 Learning MAC Addresses 98

        5.2.1.3 Filtering Frames 99

        5.2.1.4 Video Demonstration - MAC Address Tables on Connected Switches 99

        5.2.1.5 Video Demonstration - Sending a Frame to the Default Gateway 99

        5.2.1.6 Activity - Switch It! 100

        5.2.1.7 Lab - Viewing the Switch MAC Address Table 100

    5.2.2 Switch Forwarding Methods 100

        5.2.2.1 Frame Forwarding Methods on Cisco Switches 100

        5.2.2.2 Cut-Through Switching 101

        5.2.2.3 Memory Buffering on Switches 101

        5.2.2.4 Activity - Frame Forwarding Methods 102

    5.2.3 Switch Port Settings 102

        5.2.3.1 Duplex and Speed Settings 102

        5.2.3.2 Auto-MDIX 103

5.3 Address Resolution Protocol 103

    5.3.1 MAC and IP 103

        5.3.1.1 Destination on Same Network 103

        5.3.1.2 Destination Remote Network 104

        5.3.1.3 Packet Tracer — Identify MAC and IP Addresses 105

    5.3.2 ARP 105

        5.3.2.1 Introduction to ARP 105

        5.3.2.2 ARP Functions 105

        5.3.2.3 Video Demonstration — ARP Request 106

        5.3.2.4 Video Demonstration — ARP Reply 106

        5.3.2.5 Video Demonstration — ARP Role in Remote Communication 107

        5.3.2.6 Removing Entries from an ARP Table 108

        5.3.2.7 ARP Tables 108

        5.3.2.8 Packet Tracer - Examine the ARP Table 108

    5.3.3 ARP Issues 108

        5.3.3.1 ARP Broadcasts 108

        5.3.3.2 ARP Spoofing 108

5.4 Summary 109

    5.4.1 Conclusion 109

        5.4.1.1 Class Activity - MAC and Choose... 109

        5.4.1.2 Chapter 5: Ethernet 109

Chapter 6 Network Layer 113

6.0 Introduction 113

        6.0.1.1 Network Layer 113

        6.0.1.2 Class Activity - The Road Less Traveled... 113

6.1 Network Layer Protocols 114

    6.1.1 Network Layer in Communications 114

        6.1.1.1 The Network Layer 114

        6.1.1.2 Network Layer Protocols 114

    6.1.2 Characteristics of the IP Protocol 115

        6.1.2.1 Encapsulating IP 115

        6.1.2.2 Characteristics of IP 115

        6.1.2.3 IP - Connectionless 115

        6.1.2.4 IP - Best Effort Delivery 115

        6.1.2.5 IP - Media Independent 116

        6.1.2.6 Activity - IP Characteristics 116

    6.1.3 IPv4 Packet 116

        6.1.3.1 IPv4 Packet Header 116

        6.1.3.2 Video Demonstration - Sample IPv4 Headers in Wireshark 117

        6.1.3.3 Activity - IPv4 Header Fields 117

    6.1.4 IPv6 Packet 117

        6.1.4.1 Limitations of IPv4 117

        6.1.4.2 Introducing IPv6 118

        6.1.4.3 Encapsulating IPv6 118

        6.1.4.4 IPv6 Packet Header 118

        6.1.4.5 Video Demonstration - Sample IPv6 Headers and Wireshark 119

        6.1.4.6 Activity - IPv6 Header Fields 119

6.2 Routing 119

    6.2.1 How a Host Routes 119

        6.2.1.1 Host Forwarding Decision 119

        6.2.1.2 Default Gateway 120

        6.2.1.3 Using the Default Gateway 120

        6.2.1.4 Host Routing Tables 121

    6.2.2 Router Routing Tables 121

        6.2.2.1 Router Packet Forwarding Decision 121

        6.2.2.2 IPv4 Router Routing Table 121

        6.2.2.3 Video Demonstration - Introducing the IPv4 Routing Table 122

        6.2.2.4 Directly Connected Routing Table Entries 122

        6.2.2.5 Remote Network Routing Table Entries 122

        6.2.2.6 Next-Hop Address 122

        6.2.2.7 Video Demonstration — Explaining the IPv4 Routing Table 123

        6.2.2.8 Activity - Identify Elements of a Router Routing Table Entry 123

6.3 Routers 123

    6.3.1 Anatomy of a Router 123

        6.3.1.1 A Router is a Computer 123

        6.3.1.2 Router CPU and OS 124

        6.3.1.3 Router Memory 124

        6.3.1.4 Inside a Router 125

        6.3.1.5 Connect to a Router 125

        6.3.1.6 LAN and WAN Interfaces 125

        6.3.1.7 Activity - Identify Router Components 126

        6.3.1.8 Packet Tracer - Exploring Internetworking Devices 126

    6.3.2 Router Boot-up 126

        6.3.2.1 Bootset Files 126

        6.3.2.2 Router Bootup Process 126

        6.3.2.3 Video Demonstration — Router Bootup Process 127

        6.3.2.4 Show Version Output 127

        6.3.2.5 Video Demonstration - The show version Command 127

        6.3.2.6 Activity - The Router Boot Process 127

        6.3.2.7 Lab - Exploring Router Physical Characteristics 127

6.4 Configure a Cisco Router 128

    6.4.1 Configure Initial Settings 128

        6.4.1.1 Basic Switch Configuration Steps 128

        6.4.1.2 Basic Router Configuration Steps 128

        6.4.1.3 Packet Tracer - Configure Initial Router Settings 128

    6.4.2 Configure Interfaces 128

        6.4.2.1 Configure Router Interfaces 128

        6.4.2.2 Verify Interface Configuration 129

    6.4.3 Configure the Default Gateway 129

        6.4.3.1 Default Gateway for a Host 129

        6.4.3.2 Default Gateway for a Switch 130

        6.4.3.3 Packet Tracer - Connect a Router to a LAN 130

        6.4.3.4 Packet Tracer - Troubleshooting Default Gateway Issues 131

6.5 Summary 131

    6.5.1 Conclusion 131

        6.5.1.1 Class Activity - Can You Read This Map? 131

        6.5.1.2 Lab - Building a Switch and Router Network 132

        6.5.1.3 Packet Tracer - Skills Integration Challenge 132

        6.5.1.4 Network Layer 132

Chapter 7 IP Addressing 135

7.0 Introduction 135

        7.0.1.1 IP Addressing 135

        7.0.1.2 Class Activity — The Internet of Everything (IoE) 135

7.1 IPv4 Network Addresses 135

    7.1.1 Binary and Decimal Conversion 135

        7.1.1.1 IPv4 Addresses 135

        7.1.1.2 Video Demonstration — Converting Between Binary and Decimal Numbering Systems 136

        7.1.1.3 Positional Notation 136

        7.1.1.4 Binary to Decimal Conversion 136

        7.1.1.5 Activity — Binary to Decimal Conversion 137

        7.1.1.6 Decimal to Binary Conversion 137

        7.1.1.7 Decimal to Binary Conversion Examples 137

        7.1.1.8 Activity — Decimal to Binary Conversion Utility 138

        7.1.1.9 Activity — Binary Game 138

    7.1.2 IPv4 Address Structure 138

        7.1.2.1 Network and Host Portions 138

        7.1.2.2 The Subnet Mask 138

        7.1.2.3 ANDing 139

        7.1.2.4 Activity — ANDing to Determine the Network Address 139

        7.1.2.5 The Prefix Length 139

        7.1.2.6 Network, Host, and Broadcast Addresses 140

        7.1.2.7 Video Demonstration - Network, Host, and Broadcast Addresses 140

        7.1.2.8 Lab — Using the Windows Calculator with Network Addresses 140

        7.1.2.9 Lab — Converting IPv4 Addresses to Binary 140

    7.1.3 IPv4 Unicast, Broadcast, and Multicast 141

        7.1.3.1 Static IPv4 Address Assignment to a Host 141

        7.1.3.2 Dynamic IPv4 Address Assignment to a Host 141

        7.1.3.3 IPv4 Communication 141

        7.1.3.4 Unicast Transmission 142

        7.1.3.5 Broadcast Transmission 142

        7.1.3.6 Multicast Transmission 142

        7.1.3.7 Activity — Unicast, Broadcast, or Multicast 143

        7.1.3.8 Packet Tracer — Investigate Unicast, Broadcast, and Multicast Traffic 143

    7.1.4 Types of IPv4 Addressses 143

        7.1.4.1 Public and Private IPv4 Addresses 143

        7.1.4.2 Activity — Pass or Block IPv4 Addresses 144

        7.1.4.3 Special User IPv4 Addresses 144

        7.1.4.4 Legacy Classful Addressing 145

        7.1.4.5 Video Demonstration - Classful IPv4 Addressing 145

        7.1.4.6 Classless Addressing 145

        7.1.4.7 Assignment of IP Addresses 146

        7.1.4.8 Activity — Public or Private IPv4 Addresses 146

        7.1.4.9 Lab — Identifying IPv4 Addresses 146

7.2 IPv6 Network Addresses 147

    7.2.1 IPv4 Issues 147

        7.2.1.1 The Need for IPv6 147

        7.2.1.2 IPv4 and IPv6 Coexistence 147

        7.2.1.3 Activity — IPv4 Issues and Solutions 148

    7.2.2 IPv6 Addressing 148

        7.2.2.1 IPv6 Address Representation 148

        7.2.2.2 Rule 1 — Omit Leading 0s 148

        7.2.2.3 Rule 2 — Omit All 0 Segments 149

        7.2.2.4 Activity — Practicing IPv6 Address Representations 149

    7.2.3 Types of IPv6 Addresses 149

        7.2.3.1 IPv6 Address Types 149

        7.2.3.2 IPv6 Prefix Length 150

        7.2.3.3 IPv6 Unicast Addresses 150

        7.2.3.4 IPv6 Link-Local Unicast Addresses 151

        7.2.3.5 Activity — Identify Types of IPv6 Addresses 151

    7.2.4 IPv6 Unicast Addresses 151

        7.2.4.1 Structure of an IPv6 Global Unicast Address 151

        7.2.4.2 Static Configuration of a Global Unicast Address 152

        7.2.4.3 Dynamic Configuration - SLAAC 153

        7.2.4.4 Dynamic Configuration — DHCPv6 154

        7.2.4.5 EUI-64 Process and Randomly Generated 155

        7.2.4.6 Dynamic Link-Local Addresses 156

        7.2.4.7 Static Link-Local Addresses 157

        7.2.4.8 Verifying IPv6 Address Configuration 157

        7.2.4.9 Packet Tracer — Configuring IPv6 Addressing 158

    7.2.5 IPv6 Multicast Addresses 158

        7.2.5.1 Assigned IPv6 Multicast Addresses 158

        7.2.5.2 Solicited-Node IPv6 Multicast Addresses 159

        7.2.5.3 Lab — Identifying IPv6 Addresses 159

        7.2.5.4 Lab — Configuring IPv6 Addresses on Network Devices 159

7.3 Connectivity Verification 160

    7.3.1 ICMP 160

        7.3.1.1 ICMPv4 and ICMPv6 160

        7.3.1.2 ICMPv6 Router Solicitation and Router Advertisement Messages 161

    7.3.2 Testing and Verification 162

        7.3.2.1 Ping - Testing the Local Stack 162

        7.3.2.2 Ping — Testing Connectivity to the Local LAN 162

        7.3.2.3 Ping — Testing Connectivity to Remote 163

        7.3.2.4 Traceroute — Testing the Path 163

        7.3.2.5 Packet Tracer — Verifying IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing 164

        7.3.2.6 Packet Tracer — Pinging and Tracing to Test the Path 164

        7.3.2.7 Lab — Testing Network Connectivity with Ping and Traceroute 164

        7.3.2.8 Lab — Mapping the Internet 164

        7.3.2.9 Packet Tracer — Troubleshooting IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing 164

7.4 Summary 165

    7.4.1 Conclusion 165

        7.4.1.1 Class Activity — The Internet of Everything...Naturally! 165

        7.4.1.2 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 165

        7.4.1.3 IP Addressing 165

Chapter 8 Subnetting IP Networks 169

8.0 Introduction 169

        8.0.1.1 Subnetting IP Networks 169

        8.0.1.2 Class Activity — Call Me! 169

8.1 Subnetting an IPv4 Network 170

    8.1.1 Network Segmentation 170

        8.1.1.1 Broadcast Domains 170

        8.1.1.2 Problems with Large Broadcast Domains 170

        8.1.1.3 Reasons for Subnetting 171

    8.1.2 Subnetting an IPv4 Network 171

        8.1.2.1 Octet Boundaries 171

        8.1.2.2 Subnetting on the Octet Boundary 171

        8.1.2.3 Classless Subnetting 172

        8.1.2.4 Video Demonstration — The Subnet Mask 172

        8.1.2.5 Video Demonstration — Subnetting with the Magic Number 172

        8.1.2.6 Classless Subnetting Example 172

        8.1.2.7 Creating 2 Subnets 173

        8.1.2.8 Video Demonstration — Creating Two Equal-Sized Subnets 174

        8.1.2.9 Subnetting Formulas 174

        8.1.2.10 Creating 4 Subnets 174

        8.1.2.11 Video Demonstration — Creating Four Equal-Sized Subnets 174

        8.1.2.12 Video Demonstration — Creating Eight Equal-Sized Subnets 175

    8.1.3 Subnetting a /16 and /8 Prefix 175

        8.1.3.1 Creating Subnets with a /16 prefix 175

        8.1.3.2 Creating 100 Subnets with a /16 Network 175

        8.1.3.3 Calculating the Hosts 175

        8.1.3.4 Video Demonstration — Creating One Hundred Equal-Sized Subnets 176

        8.1.3.5 Creating 1000 Subnets with a /8 Network 176

        8.1.3.6 Video Demonstration — Subnetting Across Multiple Octets 176

    8.1.4 Subnetting to Meet Requirements 176

        8.1.4.1 Subnetting Based on Host Requirements 176

        8.1.4.2 Subnetting Based on Network Requirements 177

        8.1.4.3 Network Requirement Example 177

        8.1.4.4 Activity — Calculate the Subnet Mask 178

        8.1.4.5 Activity — Determining the Number of Bits to Borrow 178

        8.1.4.6 Lab - Calculating IPv4 Subnets 178

        8.1.4.7 Packet Tracer - Subnetting Scenario 1 178

        8.1.4.8 Lab — Designing and Implementing a Subnetted IPv4 Addressing Scheme 178

    8.1.5 Benefits of Variable Length Subnet Masking 178

        8.1.5.1 Traditional Subnetting Wastes Addresses 178

        8.1.5.2 Variable Length Subnet Masks 179

        8.1.5.3 Basic VLSM 179

        8.1.5.4 Video Demonstration — Basic VLSM 180

        8.1.5.5 VLSM in Practice 180

        8.1.5.6 VLSM Chart 180

        8.1.5.7 Video Demonstration — VLSM Example 181

        8.1.5.8 Activity — Practicing VLSM 181

8.2 Addressing Schemes 181

    8.2.1 Structured Design 181

        8.2.1.1 Network Address Planning 181

        8.2.1.2 Planning to Address the Network 182

        8.2.1.3 Assigning Addresses to Devices 182

        8.2.1.4 Packet Tracer — Designing and Implementing a VLSM Addressing Scheme 183

        8.2.1.5 Lab — Designing and Implementing a VLSM Addressing Scheme 183

8.3 Design Considerations for IPv6 183

    8.3.1 Subnetting an IPv6 Network 183

        8.3.1.1 The IPv6 Global Unicast Address 183

        8.3.1.2 Subnetting Using the Subnet ID 183

        8.3.1.3 IPv6 Subnet Allocation 184

        8.3.1.4 Packet Tracer — Implementing a Subnetted IPv6 Addressing Scheme 184

8.4 Summary 184

    8.4.1 Conclusion 184

        8.4.1.1 Class Activity — Can you call me now? 184

        8.4.1.2 Packet Tracer — Skills Integration Challenge 185

        8.4.1.3 Subnetting IP Networks 185

Chapter 9 Transport Layer 189

9.0 Introduction 189

        9.0.1.1 Transport Layer 189

        9.0.1.2 Class Activity - We Need to Talk - Game 189

9.1 Transport Layer Protocols 190

    9.1.1 Transportation of Data 190

        9.1.1.1 Role of the Transport Layer 190

        9.1.1.2 Transport Layer Responsibilities 190

        9.1.1.3 Conversation Multiplexing 190

        9.1.1.4 Transport Layer Reliability 191

        9.1.1.5 TCP 191

        9.1.1.6 UDP 191

        9.1.1.7 The Right Transport Layer Protocol for the Right Application 192

    9.1.2 TCP and UDP Overview 192

        9.1.2.1 TCP Features 192

        9.1.2.2 TCP Header 193

        9.1.2.3 UDP Features 194

        9.1.2.4 UDP Header 194

        9.1.2.5 Multiple Separate Conversations 194

        9.1.2.6 Port Numbers 194

        9.1.2.7 Socket Pairs 195

        9.1.2.8 Port Number Groups 195

        9.1.2.9 The netstat Command 196

        9.1.2.10 Activity - Compare TCP and UDP Characteristics 196

9.2 TCP and UDP 196

    9.2.1 TCP Communication Process 196

        9.2.1.1 TCP Server Processes 196

        9.2.1.2 TCP Connection Establishment 196

        9.2.1.3 TCP Session Termination 197

        9.2.1.4 TCP Three-way Handshake Analysis 197

        9.2.1.5 Video Demonstration — TCP 3-Way Handshake 198

        9.2.1.6 Lab - Using Wireshark to Observe the TCP 3-Way Handshake 198

        9.2.1.7 Activity - TCP Connection and Termination Process 198

    9.2.2 Reliability and Flow Control 198

        9.2.2.1 TCP Reliability - Ordered Delivery 198

        9.2.2.2 Video Demonstration - Sequence Numbers and Acknowledgments 199

        9.2.2.3 Video Demonstration - Data Loss and Retransmission 199

        9.2.2.4 TCP Flow Control - Window Size and Acknowledgments 199

        9.2.2.5 TCP Flow Control - Congestion Avoidance 200

    9.2.3 UDP Communication 200

        9.2.3.1 UDP Low Overhead versus Reliability 200

        9.2.3.2 UDP Datagram Reassembly 201

        9.2.3.3 UDP Server Processes and Requests 201

        9.2.3.4 UDP Client Processes 201

        9.2.3.5 Lab - Using Wireshark to Examine a UDP DNS Capture 202

    9.2.4 TCP or UDP 202

        9.2.4.1 Applications that use TCP 202

        9.2.4.2 Applications that use UDP 202

        9.2.4.3 Lab - Using Wireshark to Examine FTP and TFTP Captures 202

        9.2.4.4 Activity - TCP, UDP, or Both 202

9.3 Summary 203

    9.3.1 Conclusion 203

        9.3.1.1 Class Activity - We Need to Talk, Again - Game 203

        9.3.1.2 Packet Tracer - TCP and UDP Communications 203

        9.3.1.3 Transport Layer 204

Chapter 10 Application Layer 207

10.0 Introduction 207

        10.0.1.1 Chapter 10: Application Layer 207

        10.0.1.2 Class Activity — Application Investigation 207

10.1 Application Layer Protocols 207

    10.1.1 Application, Presentation, and Session 207

        10.1.1.1 Application Layer 207

        10.1.1.2 Presentation and Session Layer 208

        10.1.1.3 TCP/IP Application Layer Protocols 208

        10.1.1.4 Activity — Application and Presentation (Protocols and Standards) 208

    10.1.2 How Application Protocols Interact with End-User Applications 208

        10.1.2.1 Client-Server Model 208

        10.1.2.2 Peer-to-Peer Networks 209

        10.1.2.3 Peer-to-Peer Applications 209

        10.1.2.4 Common P2P Applications 209

        10.1.2.5 Lab — Researching Peer-to-Peer File Sharing 210

10.2 Well-Known Application Layer Protocols and Services 210

    10.2.1 Web and Email Protocols 210

        10.2.1.1 Hypertext Transfer Protocol and Hypertext Markup Language 210

        10.2.1.2 HTTP and HTTPS 211

        10.2.1.3 Email Protocols 211

        10.2.1.4 SMTP Operation 211

        10.2.1.5 POP Operation 212

        10.2.1.6 IMAP Operation 212

        10.2.1.7 Packet Tracer — Web and Email 212

    10.2.2 IP Addressing Services 212

        10.2.2.1 Domain Name Service 212

        10.2.2.2 DNS Message Format 213

        10.2.2.3 DNS Hierarchy 213

        10.2.2.4 The nslookup Command 214

        10.2.2.5 Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol 214

        10.2.2.6 DHCP Operation 215

        10.2.2.7 Packet Tracer — DHCP and DNS Servers 215

        10.2.2.8 Lab — Observing DNS Servers 215

    10.2.3 File Sharing Services 215

        10.2.3.1 File Transfer Protocol 215

        10.2.3.2 Server Message Block 216

        10.2.3.3 Packet Tracer - FTP 216

        10.2.3.4 Lab — Exploring FTP 217

10.3 Summary 217

    10.3.1 Conclusion 217

        10.3.1.1 Modeling Activity — Make it happen! 217

        10.3.1.2 Packet Tracer - Explore a Network 217

        10.3.1.3 Packet Tracer - Multiuser - Tutorial 217

        10.3.1.4 Packet Tracer Multiuser - Implement Services 217

        10.3.1.5 Application Layer 217

Chapter 11 Build a Small Network 221

11.0 Introduction 221

        11.0.1.1 Build a Small Network 221

        11.0.1.2 Class Activity - Did You Notice...? 221

11.1 Network Design 221

    11.1.1 Devices in a Small Network 221

        11.1.1.1 Small Network Topologies 221

        11.1.1.2 Device Selection for a Small Network 222

        11.1.1.3 IP Addressing for a Small Network 223

        11.1.1.4 Redundancy in a Small Network 223

        11.1.1.5 Traffic Management 224

    11.1.2 Small Network Applications and Protocols 224

        11.1.2.1 Common Applications 224

        11.1.2.2 Common Protocols 224

        11.1.2.3 Voice and Video Applications 225

    11.1.3 Scale to Larger Networks 226

        11.1.3.1 Small Network Growth 226

        11.1.3.2 Protocol Analysis 226

        11.1.3.3 Employee Network Utilization 226

11.2 Network Security 227

    11.2.1 Security Threats and Vulnerabilities 227

        11.2.1.1 Types of Threats 227

        11.2.1.2 Physical Security 227

        11.2.1.3 Types of Vulnerabilities 228

        11.2.1.4 Activity - Security Threats and Vulnerabilities 228

    11.2.2 Network Attacks 228

        11.2.2.1 Types of Malware 228

        11.2.2.2 Reconnaissance Attacks 229

        11.2.2.3 Access Attacks 229

        11.2.2.4 Denial of Service Attacks 230

        11.2.2.5 Activity - Types of Attack 230

        11.2.2.6 Lab - Researching Network Security Threats 230

    11.2.3 Network Attack Mitigation 230

        11.2.3.1 Backup, Upgrade, Update, and Patch 230

        11.2.3.2 Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting 230

        11.2.3.3 Firewalls 231

        11.2.3.4 Endpoint Security 231

    11.2.4 Device Security 231

        11.2.4.1 Device Security Overview 231

        11.2.4.2 Passwords 232

        11.2.4.3 Basic Security Practices 232

        11.2.4.4 Enable SSH 233

        11.2.4.5 Packet Tracer - Configuring Secure Passwords and SSH 233

        11.2.4.6 Lab - Accessing Network Devices with SSH 233

        11.2.4.7 Lab - Examining Telnet and SSH in Wireshark 234

        11.2.4.8 Lab - Securing Network Devices 234

11.3 Basic Network Performance 234

    11.3.1 The ping Command 234

        11.3.1.1 Interpreting Ping Results 234

        11.3.1.2 Extended Ping 235

        11.3.1.3 Network Baseline 235

    11.3.2 The traceroute and tracert Command 235

        11.3.2.1 Interpreting Trace Messages 235

        11.3.2.2 Extended Traceroute 236

        11.3.2.3 Packet Tracer — Test Connectivity with Traceroute 236

        11.3.2.4 Lab -Testing Network Latency with Ping and Traceroute 236

    11.3.3 Show Commands 237

        11.3.3.1 Common show Commands Revisited 237

        11.3.3.2 Video Demonstration - The show version Command 237

        11.3.3.3 Packet Tracer - Using show Commands 237

    11.3.4 Host and IOS Commands 237

        11.3.4.1 The ipconfig Command 237

        11.3.4.2 The arp Command 238

        11.3.4.3 The show cdp neighbors Command 238

        11.3.4.4 The show ip interface brief Command 239

        11.3.4.5 Activity - Show Commands 239

        11.3.4.6 Lab - Using the CLI to Gather Network Device Information 239

    11.3.5 Debugging 239

        11.3.5.1 The debug Command 239

        11.3.5.2 The terminal monitor Command 240

11.4 Network Troubleshooting 241

    11.4.1 Troubleshooting Methodologies 241

        11.4.1.1 Basic Troubleshooting Approaches 241

        11.4.1.2 Resolve or Escalate? 241

        11.4.1.3 Verify and Monitor Solution 241

        11.4.1.4 Activity — Order the Troubleshooting Steps 242

    11.4.2 Troubleshoot Cables and Interfaces 242

        11.4.2.1 Duplex Operation 242

        11.4.2.2 Duplex Mismatch 242

    11.4.3 Troubleshooting Scenarios 243

        11.4.3.1 IP Addressing Issues on IOS Devices 243

        11.4.3.2 IP Addressing Issues on End Devices 243

        11.4.3.3 Default Gateway Issues 244

        11.4.3.4 Troubleshooting DNS Issues 244

        11.4.3.5 Lab - Troubleshooting Connectivity Issues 245

        11.4.3.6 Packet Tracer - Troubleshooting Connectivity Issues 245

11.5 Summary 245

    11.5.1 Conclusion 245

        11.5.1.1 Class Activity - Design and Build a Small Business Network 245

        11.5.1.2 Packet Tracer - Skill Integration Challenge 246

        11.5.1.3 Packet Tracer - Troubleshooting Challenge 246

        11.5.1.4 Build a Small Network 246

9781587133596   TOC   9/30/2016

Unlimited one-month access with your purchase
Free Safari Membership