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The Basic Uses of TCP/IP Route Maps

Chapter Description

Route maps are similar to access lists; they both have criteria for matching the details of certain packets and an action of permitting or denying those packets. This chapter explains the basics of Route Maps. Included are sample exercises to help you practice administration and use of Route Maps.

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Configuration Exercises

  1. Configure policy routes for Router A in Figure 14-14 that forward packets from subnets 172.16.1.0/28 through 172.16.1.112/28 to Router D and forward packets from subnets 172.16.1.128/28 through 172.16.1.240/28 to Router E.

    14fig14.gif

    Figure 14-14 The network for Configuration Exercises 1 through 3.

  2. Configure policy routes for Router A in Figure 14-14 so that packets from subnets 172.16.1.64/28 through 172.16.1.112/28 are forwarded to Router D if they are received from Router C. If packets from the same subnets are received from Router B, forward them to Router E. All other packets should be forwarded normally.

  3. Configure policy routes for Router A in Figure 14-14 that will forward any packets destined for subnets 172.16.1.0/28 through 172.16.1.240/28, sourced from an SMTP port, to Router C. Route any other UDP packets destined for the same subnets to Router B. No other packets should be forwarded to Routers C or B by either the policy routes or the normal routing protocol.

  4. The OSPF and EIGRP configuration for the router in Figure 14-15 is

             router eigrp 1
    
             network 192.168.100.0
    
             !
    
             router ospf 1
    
             network 192.168.1.0 0.0.0.255 area 16
          
    14fig15.gif

    Figure 14-15 The router for Configuration Exercises 4 and 5.

    Configure the router to redistribute internal EIGRP routes into OSPF as E1 routes with a metric of 10 and to redistribute external EIGRP routes into OSPF as E2 routes with a metric of 50. Of the networks and subnets shown in the EIGRP domain, all should be redistributed except 10.201.100.0/24.

  5. Configure the router in Figure 14-15 to redistribute internal OSPF routes into EIGRP with a lower delay than external OSPF routes. Allow only the three Class C networks shown in the OSPF domain to be redistributed.

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